“Don’t Throw Out The Bible, Understand It”~ John Henrik Clarke

Published on Jan 2, 2013

The Bible is full of African history and folklore, intertwined with Jewish myth. In this clip the respected and renowned African scholar, John Henrick Clarke, encourages Africans to extract the value embed in the writings that have preserved our African stories throughout the last three millenniums.

Hermetic

Dr. John Henrik Clarke – Education: The Highest Form of Struggle

John Henrik Clarke
Writer
Dr. John Henrik Clarke, was a Pan-Africanist writer, historian, professor, and a pioneer in the creation of Africana studies and professional institutions in academia starting in the late 1960s. Wikipedia
Born: January 1, 1915, Union Springs, AL

Caption Option

 Picture of John Henrik Clarke

John Henrik Clarke
(1915-1998)

In 1986, the Africana Library was named in honor of John Henrik Clarke, who was widely recognized as a pioneer in the field of Africana Studies. Dr. Clarke played an important role in the early history of Cornell University’s Africana Studies & Research Center. He was a Distinguished Visiting Professor of African History at the Center in the 1970s. He also made an invaluable contribution to the establishment of its curricula.

Dr. Clarke is the author of numerous articles that have appeared in leading scholarly journals. He also served as the author, contributor, or editor of 24 books. In 1968 along with the Black Caucus of the African Studies Association, Dr. Clarke founded the African Heritage Studies Association. In 1969 he was appointed as the founding chairman of the Black and Puerto Rican Studies Department at Hunter College in New York City.

Dr. Clarke was most known and highly regarded for his lifelong devotion to studying and documenting the histories and contributions of African peoples in Africa and the diaspora.

Dr. Clarke is often quoted as stating that “History is not everything, but it is a starting point. History is a clock that people use to tell their political and cultural time of day. It is a compass they use to find themselves on the map of human geography. It tells them where they are, but more importantly, what they must be.”

Featured Web Sites About John Henrik Clarke:

The John Henrik Clarke Virtual Museum
In Memory of John Henrik Clarke (Hunter College)
Schomburg Legacy Exhibition: John Henrik Clarke Section

John Henrik Clarke Bibliographies (Cornell University)
John Henrik Clarke Resources (Runoko Rashidi)
Information on Film, John Henrik Clarke: A Great & Mighty Walk

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s