BLACK DEATH IN 2013

BLACK DEATH IN 2013

WE CONTINUE TO ALLOW HUMANS, TO BE TREATED LIKE ANIMALS. THIS IS NOT SOMETHING THAT JUST HAPPENS. WE KNOW THE CAUSES OF THE PLAGUE, THIS MUST BE DONE BY DESIGN !

Bubonic plague

Bubonic plague is something many people in the west associate with the past. It was a disease that killed thousands of people in the Middle Ages, mainly in the 14th and 17th centuries. However, bubonic plague is still a problem in 2013, with 39 people currently dead from the disease in Madagascar.

This is not a new thing. Last year, there were 256 cases of the plague around the African island. From that, 60 people died. This is a higher rate than any other country, and is considered a big problem.

KNOWING THAT WE CONTINUE TO ALLOW HUMANS, TO BE TREATED LIKE ANIMALS. THIS IS NOT SOMETHING THAT JUST HAPPENS. WE KNOW THE CAUSES, THIS MUST BE DONE BY DESIGN !

The last time the Western World saw this disease spread and become a major concern was in the 19th century. However, it has also been seen in the 14th and 17th centuries and was known as the Black Death due to the symptoms and number of people that died. Mass graves were dug because so many families fell victim and died. Red crosses were placed on doors of the homes with the plague, so the public were warned to stay away.

It is now known that the plague spread due to vermin, especially rats, which seems to be the case for Madagascar. Many of the prisons on the island are full of rats, especially the 3,000-inmate facility, Antanimora. The Red Cross warned that the facilities and overcrowding could lead to an outbreak across the whole country. Visitors and prison officers ran the risk of catching the disease, and would spread it to the world outside of the prison walls.
READ MORE, CLICK THRU:

!  !  !  A  Deadly Bubonic Plague Rocks

Madagascar bubonic plague warning

10 October 2013

The International Committee of the Red Cross has warned that bubonic plague is still a threat in many parts of the world.

Last year more cases were registered in Madagascar than anywhere else.

The ICRC is joining forces with the Pasteur Institute to try to eradicate the disease.

IS THERE SUPPORT THAT THIS HAS BEEN DONE BY DESIGN IN MANS HISTORY ?

Early outbreaks

Bubonic plague victims in a mass grave from 1720–1721 in Martigues, France
From a series of images showing the areas in Sydney, Australia, affected by the outbreak of Bubonic Plague in 1900. Taken by Mr. John Degotardi, Jr., photographer from the Department of Public Works, the images depict the state of the houses and ‘slum’ buildings at the time of the outbreak and the cleansing and disinfecting operations which followed.
Main articles: Plague of Justinian, Black Death, and Third plague pandemic

The first recorded epidemic ravaged the Byzantine Empire during the sixth century, and was named the Plague of Justinian after emperor Justinian I, who was infected but survived through extensive treatment.[9][10] The epidemic is estimated to have killed approximately 50 million people in the Roman Empire alone.[11] The historian Procopius wrote, in Volume II of History of the Wars, his encounter with the plague and the effect it had on the rising empire. In the spring of 542, the plague arrived in Constantinople, working its way from port city to port city and spreading through the Mediterranean, later migrating inland eastward into Asia Minor and west into Greece and Italy. Because the infectious disease spread inland by the transferring of merchandise through Justinian’s efforts in acquiring luxurious goods of the time and exporting supplies, his capital became the leading exporter of the bubonic plague. Procopius, in his work Secret History, declared that Justinian was a demon of an emperor who either created the plague himself or was being punished for his sinfulness.[11]
READ MORE:

!  !  !  a  rat looks at you -

News In Two Minutes – Plague Becomes Airborne –

Black Death
Main article: Black Death

In the Late Middle Ages (1340–1400) Europe experienced the most deadly disease outbreak in history when the Black Death, the infamous pandemic of bubonic plague, hit in 1347, killing a third of the human population. It is believed that society subsequently became more violent as the mass mortality rate cheapened life and thus increased warfare, crime, popular revolt, waves of flagellants, and persecution.[12] The Black Death originated in or near China and spread from Italy and then throughout other European countries. Arab historians, Ibn Al-Wardni and Almaqrizi believed that origins of the Black Death started off in Mongolia. Later, it was proven that their thesis was correct, as Chinese records showed that the disease made a huge outbreak in Mongolia in the early 1330s.[13] Research published in 2002 suggests that it began in the spring of 1346 in the steppe region, where a plague reservoir stretches from the northwestern shore of the Caspian Sea into southern Russia. The Mongols had cut off the trade route, the Silk Road, between China and Europe which halted the spread of the Black Death from eastern Russia to Western Europe. The epidemic began with an attack that Mongols launched on the Italian merchant’s last trading station in the region, Caffa in the Crimea.[14] In the autumn of 1346, plague broke out among the besiegers and from them penetrated into the town. When spring arrived, the Italian merchants fled on their ships, unknowingly carrying the Black Death. Carried by the fleas on rats, the plague initially spread to humans near the Black Sea and then outwards to the rest of Europe as a result of people fleeing from one area to another.

There were many ethno-medical beliefs of prevention methods for avoiding the Black Death. One of the most famous ideas was that by walking around with flowers in or around their nose people would be able to “ward off the stench and perhaps the evil that afflicted them. Since the people didn’t have the knowledge to understand the plague, people believed the plague to be a punishment from God. The only way to be rid of the plague was to be forgiven by God.[15] One such method used was to carve the symbol of the cross onto the front door of a house with the words “Lord have mercy on us” near it.

READ MORE:

!  !  !  a  fluoride or Fearful

Bubonic plague killed 20 villagers in Madagascar, health experts confirm

Once feared as the Black Death – the rodent-borne disease that wiped out a third of the world’s population in the Middle Ages – bubonic plague has killed 20 villagers in Madagascar in one of the worst outbreaks globally in recent years, health experts have confirmed.

The confirmation that bubonic plague was responsible for the deaths last week near the north-western town of Mandritsara follows a warning in October from the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) that the island nation was at risk of a plague epidemic.

READ MORE:

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s